source: branches/2.2.2/mindi-busybox/loginutils/Config.in @ 1247

Last change on this file since 1247 was 902, checked in by Bruno Cornec, 14 years ago

mindi-busybox now uses busybox 1.2.2 (Thanks Rob for that last update and good lucck for your future projects).

File size: 4.9 KB
Line 
1#
2# For a description of the syntax of this configuration file,
3# see scripts/kbuild/config-language.txt.
4#
5
6menu "Login/Password Management Utilities"
7
8config CONFIG_FEATURE_SHADOWPASSWDS
9    bool "Support for shadow passwords"
10    default n
11    help
12      Build support for shadow password in /etc/shadow.  This file is only
13      readable by root and thus the encrypted passwords are no longer
14      publicly readable.
15
16config CONFIG_USE_BB_SHADOW
17    bool "  Use busybox shadow password functions"
18    default y
19    depends on CONFIG_USE_BB_PWD_GRP && CONFIG_FEATURE_SHADOWPASSWDS
20    help
21        If you leave this disabled, busybox will use the system's shadow
22        password handling functions.  And if you are using the GNU C library
23        (glibc), you will then need to install the /etc/nsswitch.conf
24        configuration file and the required /lib/libnss_* libraries in
25        order for the shadow password functions to work.  This generally
26        makes your embedded system quite a bit larger.
27
28        Enabling this option will cause busybox to directly access the
29        system's /etc/shadow file when handling shadow passwords.  This
30        makes your system smaller and I will get fewer emails asking about
31        how glibc NSS works).  When this option is enabled, you will not be
32        able to use PAM to access shadow passwords from remote LDAP
33        password servers and whatnot.
34
35config CONFIG_USE_BB_PWD_GRP
36    bool "Use internal password and group functions rather than system functions"
37    default n
38    help
39        If you leave this disabled, busybox will use the system's password
40        and group functions.  And if you are using the GNU C library
41        (glibc), you will then need to install the /etc/nsswitch.conf
42        configuration file and the required /lib/libnss_* libraries in
43        order for the password and group functions to work.  This generally
44        makes your embedded system quite a bit larger.
45
46        Enabling this option will cause busybox to directly access the
47        system's /etc/password, /etc/group files (and your system will be
48        smaller, and I will get fewer emails asking about how glibc NSS
49        works).  When this option is enabled, you will not be able to use
50        PAM to access remote LDAP password servers and whatnot.  And if you
51        want hostname resolution to work with glibc, you still need the
52        /lib/libnss_* libraries.
53
54        If you enable this option, it will add about 1.5k to busybox.
55
56config CONFIG_ADDGROUP
57    bool "addgroup"
58    default n
59    help
60      Utility for creating a new group account.
61
62config CONFIG_DELGROUP
63    bool "delgroup"
64    default n
65    help
66      Utility for deleting a group account.
67
68config CONFIG_ADDUSER
69    bool "adduser"
70    default n
71    help
72      Utility for creating a new user account.
73
74config CONFIG_DELUSER
75    bool "deluser"
76    default n
77    help
78      Utility for deleting a user account.
79
80config CONFIG_GETTY
81    bool "getty"
82    default n
83    help
84      getty lets you log in on a tty, it is normally invoked by init.
85
86config CONFIG_FEATURE_UTMP
87    bool "Support utmp file"
88    depends on CONFIG_GETTY || CONFIG_LOGIN || CONFIG_SU || CONFIG_WHO
89    default n
90    help
91      The file /var/run/utmp is used to track who is currently logged in.
92
93config CONFIG_FEATURE_WTMP
94    bool "Support wtmp file"
95    depends on CONFIG_GETTY || CONFIG_LOGIN || CONFIG_SU || CONFIG_LAST
96    default n
97    select CONFIG_FEATURE_UTMP
98    help
99      The file /var/run/wtmp is used to track when user's have logged into
100      and logged out of the system.
101
102config CONFIG_LOGIN
103    bool "login"
104    default n
105    select CONFIG_FEATURE_SUID
106    help
107      login is used when signing onto a system.
108
109      Note that Busybox binary must be setuid root for this applet to
110      work properly.
111
112config CONFIG_FEATURE_SECURETTY
113    bool "Support for /etc/securetty"
114    default y
115    depends on CONFIG_LOGIN
116    help
117      The file  /etc/securetty  is used by (some versions of) login(1).
118      The file contains the device names of tty lines (one per line,
119      without leading /dev/) on which root is allowed to login.
120
121config CONFIG_PASSWD
122    bool "passwd"
123    default n
124    select CONFIG_FEATURE_SUID
125    help
126      passwd changes passwords for user and group accounts.  A normal user
127      may only change the password for his/her own account, the super user
128      may change the password for any account.  The administrator of a group
129      may change the password for the group.
130
131      Note that Busybox binary must be setuid root for this applet to
132      work properly.
133
134config CONFIG_SU
135    bool "su"
136    default n
137    select CONFIG_FEATURE_SUID
138    help
139      su is used to become another user during a login session.
140      Invoked without a username, su defaults to becoming the super user.
141
142      Note that Busybox binary must be setuid root for this applet to
143      work properly.
144
145config CONFIG_SULOGIN
146    bool "sulogin"
147    default n
148    help
149      sulogin is invoked when the system goes into single user
150      mode (this is done through an entry in inittab).
151
152config CONFIG_VLOCK
153    bool "vlock"
154    default n
155    select CONFIG_FEATURE_SUID
156    help
157      Build the "vlock" applet which allows you to lock (virtual) terminals.
158
159      Note that Busybox binary must be setuid root for this applet to
160      work properly.
161
162endmenu
163
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